Posts for: September, 2014

By Ligon & Ligon DDS, PA
September 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
DIYDentureRepair-DontTryThisatHome

At first glance, you might think at-home denture repair belongs in the same category as Do-It-Yourself brain surgery and cloning your pet in the kitchen sink. But the fact is, you can actually buy a variety of DIY denture repair kits on line, send for them through the mail, even pick them up at some drug stores;you can even watch a youtube video on how to do your own denture repair. So if you’re feeling like Mr. (or Ms.) Fix-it, should you give it a whirl?

Absolutely not! (Do we even have to say this?) Repairing dentures is strictly a job for professionals — and here’s why:

First off, dentures are custom-fabricated products that have to fit perfectly in order to work the way they should. They are subject to extreme biting forces, yet balance evenly on the alveolar ridges — the bony parts of the upper and lower jaw that formerly held the natural teeth. In order to ensure their quality, fit and durability, dentures are made by experienced technicians in a carefully controlled laboratory setting, and fitted by dentists who specialize in this field. So just ask yourself: What are the chances you’re going to get it right on your first try?

What’s more, the potential problems aren’t just that DIY-repaired dentures won’t feel as comfortable or work as well. Sharp edges or protruding parts could damage your gums, make them sore or sensitive, or even lacerate the soft tissues. And even if these problems don’t become apparent immediately, they may lead to worse troubles over time. Dentures that don’t fit properly can cause you to become more susceptible to oral infections, such as cheilitis and stomatitis. They may also lead to nutritional problems, since you’re likely to have difficulty eating anything but soft, processed foods.

Finally, the kits themselves just don’t offer the same quality products you’d find in a professional lab. That means whatever repairs you’re able to make aren’t likely to last very long. Plus, they contain all sorts of substances that not only smell nasty, but can quickly bond your fingers to the kitchen counter — or to the broken dentures. (Imagine trying to explain that at the emergency room…)

So do yourself a favor: If your dentures need repair, don’t try and do it yourself. Bring them in to our office — it’s the best thing for your dentures… and your health.

If you would like more information about dentures or denture repair, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Dentures” and “Removable Full Dentures.”


By Ligon & Ligon DDS, PA
September 09, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
ChippedTeethHarmoniouslyMadeGoodasNew

“Break a leg” is a well-known theatrical expression for wishing good luck to an actor about to go on stage. Singers should have one of their own…“Chip a tooth”! Apparently collisions between microphones and pearly whites are an occupational hazard for crooners. Taylor Swift became one of the latest casualties during a concert in Pittsburgh while belting out her hit “I Knew You Were Trouble.” The consummate professional, she didn’t miss a beat and kept on singing despite seeing a tooth chip hit the floor.

After all, while chipping a tooth is an inconvenience, it’s not a permanent smile wrecker. Modern dentistry offers several options for restoring a damaged tooth to its original symmetry and luster, or even better!

Bonding
Dental cosmetic bonding is the quickest and lowest-cost option to repair a chip. This involves application of a composite filling material that is colored and shaped to match the original tooth. Bonding material can be used to replace the lost portion of tooth or to seamlessly reattach the lost portion if it has been preserved and is otherwise undamaged. Little to no removal of existing tooth surface is needed.

Veneers
A veneer can be used for slightly larger areas or discolored teeth. This is a thin, custom-made shell placed on the front of the tooth to give it a new “face.” Some removal of existing tooth surface may be necessary to fit a veneer so it is flush with the surfaces of surrounding intact teeth.

Crowns
When a relatively large portion of the tooth is missing, a crown is often the better choice. It fully encases the visible portion of the remaining tooth above the gum line and is shaped and sized to match the original. It can be made of tooth-colored porcelain fused to metal crowns or all-ceramic (optimal for highly visible areas). A small amount of the existing tooth surface will be removed to allow the crown to fit over it.

If you would like more information about repairing a chipped tooth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth With Composite Resin.”